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Paint a Window

Painting Windows
While we will give you plenty of advice on how to paint windows, we will also give you a great piece of advice if you are hiring a painter to paint your windows. If you have a digital camera, take a photograph of each pane of glass in such a way that you can see whether there are any scratches on the glass.

Why do we tell you to do this? Because sandpaper scratches glass, and if an inexperienced decorator paints your windows, when sanding down the woodwork they may not be aware of any damage they are doing to the glass. On a dull day you won’t notice, but the moment the sun comes out you will see all the scratches made. However to avoid scratching the glass you don’t have to use masking tape, just use carefully folded sandpaper or a sanding sponge with a clean edge. It is then just a question of holding the sandpaper in such a way that the tips of your fingers rub against the glass while the sandpaper rubs against the wood to give a key for the paint and to remove any loose paint.

If you are starting with a brand new unpainted window:
Internally
• Apply one coat of wood primer followed by one undercoat and two top coats
• Apply one coat of varnish diluted with 25% white spirit, followed by two topcoats of varnish
• Eggshell, satinwood or gloss paint is suitable for internal window finishes.
• Clear or stained varnish, satin or gloss finish is suitable for internal window finishes
• Hardwood windows can be treated internally with a suitable oil or sealant such as Danish oil

Externally
• Apply one coat of wood primer followed by one undercoat and two top coats
• Apply one coat of varnish diluted with 25% white spirit, followed by two topcoats of varnish
• Gloss or water-based external satinwood paint are most suitable for external finishes
• Gloss varnish is suitable for windows externally.
• Hardwood windows can be treated externally with a suitable oil or sealant such as Danish oil
• With paint and varnish, gently sand down the woodwork between each coat applied, except the topcoat

Previously painted windows:
Internally
• Sand down the woodwork to remove any loose and flaking paint and to provide a key for the paint or varnish to be applied
• Apply one coat of undercoat to sanded surface if using paint.
• Apply two top coats of either paint or varnish
• Gloss paint can be changed to satin and vice versa when undercoat has been applied

Externally:
• Sand down all woodwork to remove any loose or flaking paint and to provide a key for the paint or varnish to be applied.
• Remove and replace any loose putty, allowing it to harden before applying one coat of oil-based primer.
• Apply one coat of undercoat to sanded surface if using paint
• Apply two top coats of paint or varnish
• With paint and varnish, gently sand down the woodwork between each coat applied, except the topcoat

Never shut a freshly painted window until the paint has hardened or ‘cured’ or else it will jam shut. Finally, don’t worry too much if you get a little paint on the glass. Leave the paint for about a week to cure, and then cut round where the frame and glass meet with a boxcutter or Stanley knife. After that use a ‘window blade’, which is a sharp flat blade in a holder, to push against the glass and then slide it up against the window frame. That will then lift off the paint on the glass and leave you with crisp clean paint lines.

Ask for Free Quotes From Quality Painters

As you will discover with many helpful articles we have published for you, there is considerably more involved in painting than knowing how to use a paintbrush or roller. Armed with this information we want you to feel more confident that when you ask a painter to give you a quote for painting your property, you will recognise from their answers that they clearly know what they are talking about. So have a quick look at the relevant articles and then use our simple form to request a quote from a recommended local painter or two to get the ball rolling. Request your Free Quotes here.

Take a look at the following articles:
> Painter
> Private Residential Painting
> Ratings
> Receive Quotes From Painters
> Sanding
> Paint a Door
> Paint a Room
> Paint a Staircase
> Save on Costs
> Types of Paint
> Understanding Paint Types
> Wallpaper Stripping
> What to look for in a painter?
> Wooden Doors
> Duration
> Emulsion Paint
> Mould